In October 1868, Sarah Edwards* appeared at the Oswestry sessions, together with an acquaintance named Richard Jones. They were charged with stealing a bottle of brandy.

They appear to have been regular offenders; Sarah had been acquitted of another theft six months earlier, and there are several entries in the Oswestry session records for Richard Jones, who seems to have been in and out of prison for larceny. **

Both pleaded guilty, Richard to theft and Sarah to receiving; Richard’s plea got him a sentence of seven years’ penal servitude, and Sarah received six months in prison.

She was unimpressed, however, and on the Recorder announcing her sentence, she grabbed a piece of coal that had been concealed in her clothing, and threw it at the Recorder. He was said to have ‘narrowly escaped a severe blow’.

Sarah was taken straight back to the dock after the furore had died down, and the rather cross Recorder immediately announced that she would now serve nine months in prison.

Luckily, Sarah had no more coal to throw, or she might have ended up with a longer sentence than her co-offender.

The record of the conviction, from Ancestry

*Newspaper reports refer to her as Sarah Williams, but Ancestry’s collection of crime registers names her as Sarah Edwards. It wasn’t unusual for 19th century newspapers to get often fundamental details wrong.

** It’s possible that there was more than one person named Richard Jones in this area, of course, as Oswestry is close to the Welsh border.